Category Archives: Industry News

RMEF Fires Back On Wolf Groups’ ‘Disingenuous’ Use Of Its Data

(ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION PRESS RELEASE)

In letters to legislators and newspapers across the West, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is calling out groups like Defenders of Wildlife, Western Wildlife Conservancy and others for their disingenuous use of data on wolves and elk.

The RMEF action was prompted by each group’s recent op-ed articles in the media, as well as testimony before Utah lawmakers by Western Wildlife Conservancy Executive Director Kirk Robinson. All cited RMEF statistics to argue that restored wolf populations have somehow translated to growing elk herds in the northern Rockies.

“The theory that wolves haven’t had a significant adverse impact on some elk populations is not accurate. We’ve become all too familiar with these groups’ tactic of cherry-picking select pieces of information to support their own agenda, even when it is misleading,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “We will not allow that claim to go unchallenged.”

RMEF population data, which come from state wildlife agencies, show that elk populations are expanding the most in areas of the northern Rockies where wolves are not present.

However, where elk share habitat with wolves, such as the greater Yellowstone area, some elk populations are declining fast. In fact, since the mid-1990s introduction of gray wolves, the northern Yellowstone elk herd has dropped from about 17,000 to 7,100 animals – a 58 percent decline. Other localities in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming also are documenting precipitous downward trends.

Additionally, some research shows that elk remaining in areas of concentrated wolf populations are suffering nutrition loss, lower body weights and decreasing birth rates.

Allen said, “Every wildlife conservation agency, both state and federal, working at ground zero of wolf restoration – Idaho, Montana and Wyoming — has abundant data to demonstrate how undermanaged wolf populations can compromise local elk herds and local livestock production. There’s just no dispute, and emotion-over-science is not the way to professionally manage wildlife.”

RMEF continues to support state-regulated wolf management to include hunting and other viable methods. This position is supported by new reports of diseased wolf populations in the Yellowstone area.

“When wolves are too abundant, they’re more susceptible to diseases, just like all wildlife. The viruses and mange now spreading through wolf packs is another sign of way too many wolves,” said Allen. “Defenders of Wildlife would like to spin sick wolves as a reason to end hunting. But real conservationists know that diseased wildlife populations need better management. Hunting as a management tool delivers that, period.”

He added, “Remember, pro-wolf groups make their living by prolonging this conflict. There is no real incentive for them to admit that wolves are overly recovered. Fundraising is their major motive and they’ve built a goldmine by filing lawsuits and preaching that nature will find its own equilibrium between predators and prey if man would just leave it alone. That’s a myth. The truth is that people are the most important part of the equation. This isn’t the Wild West anymore. People live here – actually quite a lot of us. So our land and resources must be managed. Wildlife must be managed. Radical spikes and dips in populations show that we should be doing it better. It’s not profitable for plaintiffs, but the rest of us would be better served if the conflict ended and conservation professionals were allowed to get on with their business of managing wildlife, including a well regulated hunting strategy.”

In 2009, RMEF got involved in the ongoing wolf litigation, supporting defendant agencies by filing legal briefs used in federal court to help delist wolves and proceed with hunting – “facts conveniently ignored by groups who misuse our name, data and credibility to prolong the conflict. We stand for elk and other wildlife and what is happening right now is simply not good wildlife management,” said Allen.

Poker, For A Cause

Got a good poker face, know the difference between a royal and straight flush, AND want to benefit Northwest sport fishing advocates?

You, my friend, may be perfect for the 1st Annual Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association Poker Tournament Fundraiser, presented by Three Rivers Marine & Tackle in Woodinville, Wash.

The event will be held March 5. It’s limited to 80 players, and seating begins at 6 p.m., shuffle up and deal at 7 p.m.

Buy-in is $100. All benefits go to the NSIA.

A partial list of the prizes include York Central AC Unit (installed), Silver Horde tackle package, private guided duck hunt, Scotty 1106 Electric Downrigger, a Sandy River steelhead trip, custom graphics, Sypher Custom Foot Orthotics, Lamiglas Rods and Yakima Bait tackle bags.

Sponsors include Three Rivers Marine, G. Loomis Rods, Daiwa Reels, Dick Nite Spoons, Trevor’s Guide Service, All Sports, Bob’s Heating & Air, Posey Company and Yakima Bait.

Three Rivers is located at 24300 Woodinville Snohomish Road, Woodinville, 98072. For more, call (425) 415-1575.

RMEF Projects In OR, WA Announced

(ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION PRESS RELEASE)

Wildlife conservation projects in 12 Oregon and 17 Washington counties have been selected to receive grants from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation in 2010.

In the Beaver State, funding totaling $153,500 will affect Benton, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Grant, Harney, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Union and Wallowa counties.

In the Evergreen State, $186,270 will go towards projects in Asotin, Chelan, Columbia, Ferry, Garfield, Jefferson, King, Kittitas, Lincoln, Pacific, Pierce, Pend Oreille, Skamania, Spokane, Stevens, Whitman and Yakima counties.

RMEF president and CEO David Allen said the grants are possible because of the successful banquets and fundraisers staged over the past year by volunteers in Washington and Oregon, “most of whom are elk hunters as well as devoted conservationists.”

Since 1984, RMEF annual grants have helped complete 433 different projects in Washington with a combined value of more than $101 million, 633 different projects in Oregon with a combined value of more than $36 million, he says.

RMEF grants will help fund the following projects, listed by county:

Asotin County, Wash.: Reduce decadent grasses and improve elk forage by prescribed burning 932 acres in the Dry Fork area of Umatilla National Forest; use herbicide to treat noxious weeds on 995 acres and re-seed native grasses on 200 acres in the Lower Grande Ronde River corridor; treat noxious weeds scattered throughout 60,640-acre Blue Mountains Wildlife Area Complex (also affects Garfield and Columbia counties); treat noxious weeds on 300 acres in the Grande Ronde River breaks to improve native forage and encourage elk to use public lands rather than private-land hayfields to the north; treat 250 acres of invasive weeds as part of an early detection rapid response program; treat 425 acres of weeds in the Snake River canyonlands; treat 200 acres of noxious weeds in the Meyer Ridge area.

Crook County, Ore.: Thin 575 acres of juniper encroachment in meadows and aspen stands, treat noxious weeds on 160 acres, and restore riparian habitat along 2 miles of stream in the Deep Creek area of Ochoco National Forest; hand-cut and burn 400 acres of encroaching juniper in the Maury Mountains area of Ochoco National Forest.

Curry County, Ore.: Prescribe burn 129 acres, and re-seed native grasses on 20 acres, to maintain forage areas for elk and other wildlife in the Wildhorse Prairie area of Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.

Deschutes County, Ore.: Thin conifer from willow and aspen stands, prescribe burn 15 acres and treat noxious weeds on 5 acres in Tumalo Creek area of Deschutes National Forest.

Douglas County, Ore.: Create 20 acres of forage openings and plant shrubs on 93 acres to improve 113 acres of habitat for elk in the Umpqua National Forest.

Ferry County, Wash.: Prescribed burn 550 acres of elk winter range to reduce hazardous fuels and improve grasses, forbs and shrubs in Colville National Forest.

Grant County, Ore.: Rehab 100 acres of meadow habitat used by foraging elk and deer in the Rudio Mountain area; thin encroaching conifer to restore 150 acres of meadow in the Logan Valley area of Malheur National Forest; remove juniper to promote sagebrush and bitterbrush growth on 1,235 acres in the Murderer?s Creek area of Malheur National Forest and state lands; re-seed native grasses on 880 acres in the Chrome Ridge area; thin 270 acres, construct fencing around 2 acres of aspen stands, treat noxious weeds and reconstruct two springs in Ochoco National Forest.

Harney County, Ore.: Enhance habitat for elk and other wildlife by repairing wildlife drinking stations, collecting native shrub seeds, reseeding habitat areas and employing livestock practices to control noxious weeds in the Egley wildfire area of Malheur National Forest; thin encroaching conifer on 160 acres, replace fencing around aspen stands and develop five ponds or wildlife drinking stations in the Pine Creek area of Malheur National Forest.

Kittitas County, Wash.: Provide funding for Green Dot Access Management Program projects managed by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (also affects Chelan, King, Jefferson, Pierce and Yakima counties).

Lane County, Ore.: Improve forage for elk by removing encroaching conifer and noxious weeds to restore 283 acres of meadows in Willamette National Forest; treat noxious weeds and re-seed native grasses on 100 acres, and rejuvenate browse on 102 acres, in the Foley Ridge area of Willamette National Forest; thin and prescribe burn 112 acres and re-seed native grasses in the Chucksney and Grasshopper meadows area of Willamette National Forest; prescribe burn 56 acres, plant oak seedlings on 40 acres, and re-seed native grasses on 200 acres in the Jim?s Creek area of Willamette National Forest; mechanically treat noxious weeds and re-seed native grasses on 500 acres in the Siuslaw National Forest (also affects Benton, Douglas and Lincoln counties).

Linn County, Ore.: Remove encroaching trees from meadow complexes used year-round by foraging elk in the Lodgepole Flats area of Willamette National Forest; create 40 acres of forage openings in the Yellowstone Creek area of BLM lands.

Pacific County, Wash.: Improve forage for elk, dusky Canada geese and other wildlife by treating noxious weeds, cultivating, applying lime, fertilizing, seeding and mowing on 200 acres at Chinook Wildlife Area.

Pend Oreille County, Wash.: Enhance meadow habitat for elk by thinning 96 acres of encroaching forest and installing fencing to protect aspen stands in the Pend Oreille Valley area of Colville National Forest; prescribed burn 200 acres to improve forage in the Upper Middle Fork of Calispell Creek area of Colville National Forest; rejuvenate browse species by prescribed burning 90 acres in the Lost Creek area of Colville National Forest.

Skamania County, Wash.: Thin encroaching conifers on 617 acres to promote forage for elk and other wildlife in the Wind River area of Gifford Pinchot National Forest.

Spokane County, Wash.: Capture and radio-collar 20 elk for a research project to study elk movement patterns and habitat use in response to a new hunt program at Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge (also affects Whitman and Lincoln counties).

Stevens County, Wash.: Prescribed burn 200 acres to reduce conifers and improve grassland habitat for elk in Colville National Forest.

Union County, Ore.: Control noxious weeds, re-seed native grasses and develop water sources for elk and other wildlife on 705 acres near Ladd Marsh Wildlife Management Area.

Wallowa County, Ore.: Treat 828 acres of noxious weeds to improve forage for elk along the Grande Ronde and Imnaha river corridors (also affects Union County).

Cabela’s Continues Partnership With RMEF

(ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION PRESS RELEASE)
MISSOULA, Mont.—More than 6,500 conservation projects completed. Over 5.7 million acres of habitat, mostly on public land, enhanced or protected. Nearly 600,000 acres opened or secured for public access. These and other milestone achievements of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation wouldn’t be possible without partners like Cabela’s.

One of the organization’s longest and most generous supporters, Cabela’s has announced renewed sponsorship of several RMEF initiatives for 2010.

“Conservation and stewardship of wildlife and wild lands is at the core of our business,” said Cabela’s Chief Executive Officer Tommy Millner. “We’re proud to partner with and support the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation in their efforts to preserve the heritage of conservation that’s so important to our customers and our employees.”

For 2010, Cabela’s is again donating gift cards and merchandise used as premiums in RMEF membership drives, contributing items for auctions and other fundraisers, underwriting the RMEF 2010 conservation art print, sponsoring Elk Camp seminars and the Elk Country Legacy mission campaign, and more.

“Cabela’s is more than the World’s Foremost Outfitter; it’s one of the reasons why RMEF has become a premier force for conservation. Words don’t express our gratitude nearly as well as our rising numbers of completed projects and conserved acres,” said Steve Decker, vice president of marketing for RMEF.

He added, “We thank everyone at Cabela’s for their long and continuing partnership.”

Renaissance Marine Buys Northwest Jet Boats Brand

(RENAISSANCE MARINE GROUP PRESS RELEASE)

Dan Larson, President and CEO of Renaissance Marine Group, and Larry Whitten, founder and President of Northwest Jet Boats, Inc. of Pasco, Washington, announced that Renaissance Marine Group (“RMG”) has purchased certain manufacturing assets, inventory and rights to build and market the Northwest Jet Boat brand of welded aluminum sport and fishing boats.

Renaissance Marine Group, Inc., founded in 2000, is the parent company and manufacturer of Duckworth, Weldcraft, and Columbia Boat brands of heavy gauge welded aluminum boats from 17’ to 30’ that are sold through a network of over thirty independent marine dealers primarily in the Western U.S. and Canada.  With the acquisition of Northwest Jet Boats, RMG will consolidate production in its Clarkston, Washington factory, expand its dealer network to include the Northwest Jet Boat dealers in the U.S. and Canada, and offer the widest selection of heavy gauge welded aluminum boats in the industry.

Northwest Jet Boats, Inc. was founded in 1987 by Larry Whitten and has built and sold over 1,900 units, ranging from 18’ to 26’ inboard jets and outboard configurations.  The models are sold through a network of independent marine dealers in the Western U.S. and Canada, all of whom are expected to continue offering these fine boats as the manufacturing shifts to RMG and its larger factory capabilities.

Larry Whitten will continue as owner of the well-established Northwest Marine & Sport dealership in Pasco that is currently the largest and most prominent dealer in Northwest Jet Boat models.  His dealership will continue as a Northwest Jet Boat dealer and together with the selling entity will fulfill warranty matters on existing Northwest Jet Boats while also becoming a major warranty and service repair center for RMG’s full line of brands.  In addition, Northwest Marine & Sport is becoming a dealer for RMG’s Weldcraft brand of boats ranging from 17’ to 30’.

Larry Whitten will serve as a special Consultant to RMG for the next three years to oversee the transition in production to the Clarkston facility and to be involved in ongoing product development and marketing.

“We’re looking beyond the current marine industry downturns and planning ahead to better serve the needs of the aluminum boat buyer and dealers,” said Larson.  “The addition of Northwest Jet Boats improves our production capabilities, our buying power, and our dealer network.  We anticipate adding to our Clarkston workforce and maintaining our U.S. based production at lower costs.  Our goal is to produce superior performing boats with top quality brands and dealer support in a variety of price ranges.  This acquisition is another step forward for RMG and our team of employees, dealers and boat owners.”

For Larry Whitten, this transaction allows him to focus his effort on the successful expansion of retail opportunities at Northwest Marine & Sport by securing an ongoing relationship for developing and selling Northwest Jet boats and Weldcraft boats.

NSIA Welcomes New Board Members

NORTHWEST SPORTFISHING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION PRESS RELEASE)

The Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association (NSIA) is proud to welcome Janet Lebson, Woodland, WA, Mike Perusse, Lake Tapps, WA, and Derick Cole, Reno, NV, who were elected at the annual board of directors meeting to serve three years terms.

Janet Lebson, owner of Quest Compelling Communications, strengthens the NSIA board with nearly 20 years-worth of communications experience working for government, trade associations, businesses, and non-profit organizations in the field of conservation and outdoor recreation.  For the past 3 years, Lebson has been a columnist and news/feature writer for Fishing Tackle Retailer, the sportfishing industry’s national trade magazine, and recently became its senior writer for conservation.  She enjoys reading, watching football, playing piano, and fishing, and she and her husband spend most of their free time playing with their 2-year-old son.

Derick Cole, VP of Western Sales for Maurice Sporting Goods, lived in Alaska for 23 years, working in sporting goods retail, at the Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, and commercial fishing. Derick started his Maurice Sporting Goods career in 1995 as an Alaska Territory manager. He and his wife Meghan moved to Reno, NV in 1998 where he continued to go to school and work full time, earning a graduate degree in Organizational Management.  His passions include fly-fishing, waterfowl hunting and spending time with his two young children, teaching them about the great outdoors.

After spending three years in the United States Navy, Mike Perusse, NW Sales Representative for the Don Coffey Company, started a career as a sport fishing guided in Alaska, Washington and Oregon. Mike has been a sales rep in the Pacific Northwest since 1995, working with Shimano, G.Loomis and Power-Pro.  Mike has a Masters in Fly-Casting Instruction and regularly teaches fly-casting.  As a Co-host for Wild Country radio Show on KJR 950, Mike has a chance to interview the top performers in the industry and stay abreast of current issues.  His favorite off the clock activities are spending time with wife Carey and son Porter, and chasing King Salmon in Alaska.

NSIA President Dan Parnel is enthusiastic about the breadth of skills and talent the 2010 Board possesses.  Said Parnel, “I’m gratified to be at the helm of an Association that continues to attract youth, talent and science to our team.  The new energy these individuals bring will compliment the experience of the existing board.  Together we will continue to protect fishery resources, grow the sport fishing industry and the cultural, economic and environmental benefits of sport fishing in the northwest.”

NSIA Issues Statement On Sulfite Egg Cure Study

(NORTHWEST SPORTFISHING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION PRESS RELEASE)

On December 11th, 2009 representatives of NSIA Board, staff, scientists and members who manufacture bait cure or cured products received a briefing from ODFW staff regarding the effects of sodium sulfite in bait cures on captive populations of juvenile salmonids and trout.

The study concluded that cures with higher concentrations of sodium sulfite fed to fish in hatchery pens created various levels of mortality.  ODFW staff did not identify this issue as a substantive conservation issue and were clear that the study did not provide information as to the population effects.  Initial conversations indicated that this was not likely a crises warranting immediate regulatory action but that we may want to consider an outreach and education program that shares the results of the study for appropriate industry response.

In the meantime, the Board and Staff of NSIA are working to inform their manufacturers and members of the results of the study.  Many of NSIA’s manufacturers have indicated they will voluntarily terminate their use of sodium sulfites until further studies can determine if the effects can be replicated outside captive populations. Various NSIA retailers and manufacturers are also working on education pieces for the angling public as well. To be clear, the study has not undergone necessary peer review, was not conducted in a representative environment and has not been replicated. Still, NSIA understands the concern and is meeting those concerns head-on. NSIA’s Board recognizes that our position to eliminate sulfites pending further study will likely result in the closure of some sport fishing related businesses.  The NSIA has long supported and been champions for the highest standards of conservation related to our fishery resources. As is consistent with our guiding principles and values, we have elected to take this action in NSIA’s continuing effort to put the fish first.

We trust that members of the public and conservation community will appreciate the promptness of the NSIA’s response and the level of action embraced to address these preliminary findings.

Oregon Tuna Classic Sets Records

(OREGON TUNA CLASSIC PRESS RELEASE)

The books are closed on the 2009 season for the Oregon Tuna Classic. The upside down economy had the organizers wondering if they’d see a decrease in participants and sponsors as they worked diligently through the spring making final preparations for the first event in Newport on July 18th.

(OREGON TUNA CLASSIC)

That question was answered by a record number of participants that exceeded well over 1,400 people involved in this past summer’s events. Allstate agents Ron Brockmann along with Dennis Pendley, from Corvallis Oregon, were the title sponsors while Shimano, G.Loomis, Daiwa, The Mill Casino and Coast 105 Radio anchored the sponsorships with a combined $65,000 in donations between just the top six. That generosity and support carried over to another 81 sponsors making it another record year with sponsorships.

The popularity generated from past events drew teams from Montana, Idaho, California, Washington and Oregon. To witness the energy and excitement from 500 people setting inside one of those big tents this year is contagious and you can really see the heart of a fishermen when it comes to helping those in need.

People are still talking about the impressive line of boats that slowly worked their way out of the port of Ilwaco in the dark, it looked like a Christmas boat parade. That sight was witnessed again, a few weeks later, when over 100 spectators gathered in the dark standing on the north jetting and watched the boats come out of Garibaldi. They couldn’t see the flare start due to the fog that moved in on the beach but they could hear the tremendous roar of engines as everyone raced offshore to their favorite fishing spot.

(OREGON TUNA CLASSIC)

To say these events grew this year would almost be an understatement. Today, the Oregon Tuna Classic is the fastest growing charitable fishing tournament on the west coast. When registrations started pouring in the organizers were forced to rent three very large tents capable of handling 500-600 people. People were coming out of the woodwork to volunteer because they wanted to be a part of the excitement.

Some sponsors jumped in at times and gave more than their donations as witnessed by the guys from Weldcraft Boats who were there just to watch but got caught up in all the excitement and the next thing you knew they were helping to unload fish and help with whatever else was needed.

The growth of these events is starting to bring much needed economic benefits to the communities visited by the armada of fishermen, volunteers and spectators. Businesses in Ilwaco saw record sales for the year while Garibaldi City Manager John O’leary speculates the Oregon Tuna Classic might rival the annual Garibaldi days in generating business.

The original purpose of the Oregon Tuna Classic, OTC as many call it, was to provide a forum for fishermen to have a little friendly competition, catch albacore and donate it to the local food bank. This past summer those fishermen gave coastal food banks 18,600 pounds of tuna in addition to the economic aid from just visiting their communities.

Since 2005, over 44,300 pounds of tuna and $103,000 has been donated to the Oregon Food Bank. The OTC’s donation helped the Oregon Food bank purchase six pounds of food for every dollar donated, equivalent to a contribution weight of over 662,300 pounds of food.

(OREGON TUNA CLASSIC)

Dates have been set for the 2010 summer events, plans are being made and sponsors are being contacted to again get ready for another season. With the continued support of volunteers and sponsors alike, the OTC will continue the fight against hunger bringing its armada of fishermen and spectators into these communities.

Thank you for your support and involvement in 2009.
Del Stephens
OTC Chairman

New Book Details NW’s Top Blacktail Bucks

I’ve seen some nice pics of blacktails come into HQ this fall.

There’s Jacob Middling’s 4×4 (5-pointer with eyeguards) from the Elbe, Wash., area., and Scott Shafner‘s bootleather-brown-antlered 3×3 from the southern end of the Kitsap Peninsula.

While Jo Wiebe‘s Whidbey Island blacktail may be shy on rackage (2×2, 4×6 counting trash),  it’s up there in age — 8 to 10 years old — and weight: 163 pounds at the butcher. Ron Stever‘s whopper from just east of Snoqualmie Pass was 165 pounds on the hook while Rob Clarey‘s Vail Tree Farm buck came in at 186 pounds hanging.

Oh, yeah, there’s a lot of venison now in Northwest freezers.

And what about after dinner? Well, why not sit down to read, Blacktail Legends of the Pacific Northwest, from Northwest Big Game Inc.?

They’re the folks who put out record books for all Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana big game.

Their brand new 202-page book not only lists the top 100 biggest typical and nontypical blacktails for the Beaver, Evergreen and Golden states plus British Columbia — but also the 100 largest taken by riflemen and archers as well as the top entrants from muzzleloaders.

There are also 50 articles highlighting many of the book bucks — take note, whopper stalkers, there are tips in those stories — plus dozens upon dozens of great photographs of big bucks.

The pics are what I enjoyed the most on a quick look-through of the colorful book, especially the six shots of the freaky buck Steven Gregory took in Linn County, Ore., in 1992 — five points on the left side, 66 on the right!

In case you’re curious, according to the book, the largest typical blacktail buck was shot by Place Mcdermitt in Cowlitz County, Wash., in 1935. Interestingly, it was only scored (184 2/8) in 2007. The rack had been in Mcdermitt’s Castle Rock bar for 70 years before a patron hauled it off to a sportsman’s show for scoring.

The largest nontypical blacktail came from the south side of the Columbia — a 213 7/8 buck shot by Gordon Johnson in Clackamas County, Ore., in 1997.

The book is available for $29.95.

Other titles from Northwest Big Game Inc include Record Book for Oregon (4th Edition; $24.95); Record Book for Washington (2nd edition; $19.95); Record Book for Idaho; 1st edition; $17.95).

Northwest Big Game will also be making the rounds during the upcoming sportsman’s show season. Blacktail Legends of the Northwest will be featured at the Puyallup, Eugene, Portland, Roseburg, Medford and Yreka shows.

Northwest Sportsman will be a sponsor of the Eugene, Roseburg and Medford shows.

Win A Brand-new Rainier Tent For Your Hunting Camp!

UPDATE, JAN. 7, 2010: A winner has been declared, and it’s Lori Robelia of Orondo, Wash.!

While many fine entries came in — some in spectacular scenery, some that made us laugh — the folks at Rainier Tents judged her shot to be the best.

Thanks EVERYONE who sent us photos, we really do appreciate it!

AW
NWS

———

In case you missed that ad on page 127 of our November issue, we want your snap shots of the best and worst “Hunting Hotels” of the West. They will be entered in a contest to win a brand-new Rainier Tent!

Rainier Tents are made right here in the Northwest, have been for 113 years. Miners took ’em to Alaska during the gold rush, and these days, deer and elk hunters use them to set up veritable hotels in the wilds of Washington, Oregon and the Northern Rockies.

Now, you don’t have to actually own a Rainier Tent to enter this contest. All you have to do is send us your picture of, say, your hunting partner’s setup, one in your campground, or maybe one you’ve seen while driving over, say, Colockum Pass, the Cascades, Northeast Oregon — wherever. And if you have a Rainier Tent, sheesh, might as well send us a pic too — you might get upgraded if you win!

You can mail prints to Northwest Sportsman, Attn: Rainier Tent Contest, PO Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124-0365, or just email them to andy@nwsportsmanmag.com.

The contest is open through Dec. 31, 2009. A winner, chosen by Rainier Tents staff, will be announced Jan. 15, 2010, here. One tent will be awarded.

Check back in this space often for the latest entries. Here are a few ideas to get things started:

Rainier 1

KEITH CAMMEL WAS THE CONTEST'S FIRST ENTRANT. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

rainier 2

LOOKS LIKE SOMEONE COULD USE A NEW TENT INSTEAD OF AN OLD TARP OVER THEIR COOKING AREA! (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

rainier 3

THAT'S A NICE PAIR ... OF TENTS AT MARK WELLS' OKANOGAN COUNTY DEER CAMP. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

"SLEEPING IN THE BACK OF MY TRUCK GOT COLD. I COULD SURE USE A TENT," WRITES RICHARD HIXSON, SEEN HERE AT HIS 2008 MOOSE CAMP. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

"SLEEPING IN THE BACK OF MY TRUCK GOT OLD. I COULD USE A GOOD TENT," WRITES RICHARD HIXSON, SEEN HERE DURING HIS 2008 MOOSE HUNT. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

rainier 4

CERTAINLY THE HIGHEST HUNTING CAMP WE'VE SEEN SO FAR, AND TONY MORALES' IS ALSO THE MOST SPARTAN. "ONE TARP, TWO BED ROLLS. THAT'S ALL I GOT! I GET WET SOMETIMES," HE WRITES. AHH, BUT THE VIEWS. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

rainier 6

TONY MORALES' CAMP (PHOTO ABOVE THIS) CERTAINLY IS WAY BACK AND IN, AND SO IS JOE FAULKNER'S MOUNTAIN GOAT BASE CAMP -- 17 MILES BACK INTO THE ALASKAN BUSH. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

rainier 7

DAVID SCHUURMAN AND FRIENDS FONDLY RECALL THE MEMORIES FROM THIS 1996 CAMP IN MONTANA'S MISSOURI RIVER BREAKS. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

rainier 8

BRIAN NYGREN'S 2002 HUNTING CAMP LOOKS COZY ... (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

... AS DOES HIS 2003 SETUP. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

... AS DOES HIS 2003 CAMP. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

rainier 10

TENT? WHO NEEDS ONE, MICHAEL BLAKE'S PA (PICTURED HERE), MIGHT ARGUE, BUT HIS SON "SHORE COULD USE A TENT," SO BLAKE SUBMITTED THIS SHOT. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

WELL, NOT EXACTLY A HUNTING CAMP, BUT ALL THOSE TENTS AT THE WASHINGTON MOUNTAIN MEN'S OLD GATHERING AT BLEWETT PASS SURE LOOK GOOD. MICHAEL BLAKE OF CHEHALIS SENT THE IMAGE. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

THEY HUNT HARD AT KEVIN MEDVED AND FRIENDS' "VIAGRA CAMP" IN COLORADO'S UNIT 33, BUT SOMETIMES ... (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

... THE WIND BLOWS HARDER. MEDVED SAYS A "ONCE IN A DECADE" STORM TOPPLED AN OLD ASPEN ONTO CAMP VIAGRA, TURNING IT INTO A LIMP PILE OF CANVAS. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

BUT MOTHER NATURE'S NO MATCH FOR CAMP VIAGRA -- IT ROSE AGAIN, ERR, SORT OF. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

SHEESH, MEDVED AND THE BOYS EVEN HAVE A CAMP VIAGRA PENANT! (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

LORI ROBELIA'S CAMP WAS A GREAT HOME AWAY FROM HOME DURING HER 11-DAY ANY-BULL COLOCKUM ELK HUNT. "OUR 12x16 RAINIER WALL TENT DID THE JOB AGAIN IN SUNSHINE TO 3-PLUS INCHES OF SNOW THAT CAME AND WENT! THERE'S NOTHING LIKE A COMFORTABLE, WARM CAMP TO KEEP YOU CHASING THE BIG ONES! AND YES, MY TAG WAS FILLED WITH JUST MY SECOND BULL ELK," SHE WRITES. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

AHHH, YES, NOTHING LIKE CUTTING UP A LITTLE WOOD FOR THE EVENING FIRE UP AT ELK CAMP HIGH IN THE CRISP FALL MOUNTAINS OF COLORADO ... (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

... TAKING A MOMENT TO ENJOY THE BREATHTAKING SCENERY OF THE ROCKIES ... (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

... BEING TOGETHER WITH FRIENDS AT A SPECIAL TIME OF YEAR ... (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

... AND, TO UNWIND AT THE END OF THE DAY, DOING A BACK FLIP INTO THE CAMPFIRE. GARETT HOCH SENT THIS AND THE ABOVE TWO PICS ALONG. "OUR GROUP IS IN THE NORTHWEST COLORADO FLAT TOPS FROM OCTOBER THROUGH NOVEMBER (FIRST SEASON ELK-THIRD SEASON ELK. WE HAVE HAD SOME SUCCESSFUL HUNTS, AND SOME NOT SO MUCH, BUT WE ALWAYS HAVE A GREAT TIME WITH EACH OTHERS' COMPANY." (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

WHAT BETTER USE FOR YOUR GAME POLE -- ESPECIALLY IF IT ISN'T BEING USED -- THAN TO HANG A PIñATA FROM?!?! "WHEN YOUR DAUGHTER'S BIRTHDAY IS THE DAY AFTER OPENING DAY OF (EARLY ARCHERY) ELK SEASON, YOU JUST HAVE TO PARTY AT CAMP," WRITES MICHAEL BLAKE. "CAMP" WAS IN WASHINGTON'S MANASTASH UNIT, NORTHWEST OF YAKIMA. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

BIRTHDAY GIRL RUBY RELAXES AFTERWARDS WITH MOMMA IN THE HAMMOCK ... (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

AFTER THE PARTY, RUBY RELAXES IN THE HAMMOCK ... (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

... AND TRIES ON DAD'S ELK HUNTING CAMO DO-RAG. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

IT'S WHAT'S INSIDE -- NOT JUST OUTSIDE -- THAT COUNTS AT BOB CUMMINGS' ELK CAMP. THE PHOENIX, ORE., RESIDENT SAYS HE'S HAD THIS TENT GOING ON 21 SEASONS, "AND IT STILL HAS THE MAGIC. SIGNING THE WALL INSIDE IS ALMOST AS FUN AS THE HUNTING." (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

OUR MOST PROLIFIC CONTEST ENTRANT, MICHAEL BLAKE SENT US THIS SHOT OF EVENING OVER AN IDAHO DEER/ELK CAMP. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

IF IT SNOWS THIS MUCH, YOU BETTER HAVE A NICE 'N SNUG TENT! RANDY MARTIN SENT US A MESS OF PICS FROM HIS FAMILY'S "YEAR-ROUND CANVAS HOTEL LOCATED DEEP IN CENTRAL OREGON." (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

MARTIN, A SPRINGFIELD, ORE., RESIDENT SAYS THEY USE THE TENT AS THEIR BASE TO HUNT, FISH AND RIDE ATV'S THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

"MANY, MANY SUCCESSFUL ELK, DEER, COUGAR AND COYOTE HUNTS," WRITES MARTIN. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

"ALMOST HOME AWAY FROM HOME," HE ADDS. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

YEP, A VERY SWEET MOUNTAIN MOTEL! (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

HAVE WE MENTIONED HOW LONG-LASTING CANVAS TENTS CAN BE? "THIS PICTURE WAS TAKEN IN 1999," WRITES DAN ROBELIA OF CHELAN. "AN OLD CLASSIC, THIS BLUE RAINIER TENT WAS PURCHASED IN THE '80S USED. STILL BEING USED FOR DEER CAMP TODAY!" (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

LARRY SCOGGIN'S ELK CAMP JUST BELOW 5,000 FEET IN THE BLUE MOUNTAINS SURE LOOKS SNUG! "THIS BIG TENT IS 16 YEARS OLD AND WE GOT IT IN 1993," HE WRITES. AS FOR WHY 1937'S WRITTEN ON THE FRONT, SCOGGIN SAYS THAT'S THE YEAR HIS FATHER AND UNCLES STARTED HUNTING THE AREA. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)

WHOSE NYLON IGLOO IS ABOUT TO COLLAPSE AND DUMP SEVERAL INCHES OF SNOW ON THE HUNTERS INSIDE? "A LITTLE SNOW DURING LATE SEASON IN THE NACHES SHOWS HOW HANDY A GOOD TENT WOULD BE," WRITES MICHAEL BLAKE. (RAINIER TENTS PHOTO CONTEST)