Snake’s Boyer Park Tops Again For Pikeminnow Removers

Boyer Park on the Snake below Lower Granite Dam maintained its grip as the most productive midsummer spot for pikeminnow for the fourth week in a row with a haul of 1,345 qualifying fish last week.

Though the July 24-30 catch is also down from the previous week, it’s still nearly 575 more than the second best station, Greenbelt, also on the Snake, where 774 were brought in for the sport reward program.

A MAP ON PIKEMINNOW.ORG SHOWS HOT SPOTS AROUND BOYER PARK, WHICH IS BELOW LOWER GRANITE DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER. (PIKEMINNOW.ORG)

Coming in third and fourth were two Lower Columbia stations: Cathlamet, with 701, and Kalama, with 510, according to the latest figures from program manager Eric Winther.

Winther also reported that this year’s fishery will now run all the way through Sept. 30. There had been some question whether funding would be available after Aug. 31.

The week’s overall catch was 6,468, down from 7,148.

Lyons Ferry had the highest catch per angler, with 20.2 for the six participants, followed by 17.3 at Giles French and 14.2 at Beacon Rock.

The overall average per angler was 6.3 pikeminnows for 1,024 participants, up about half a fish a fisherman over the previous week.

Six specially tagged pikeminnow were turned in last week, with two at Cathlamet, and one each at Gleason, Chinook Landing, Giles French and Greenbelt.

All totaled, 127,482 qualifying pikeminnow have been removed from the Columbia and Snake since the start of season May 1.

The Dalles has been most productive, with 43,847, followed by Boyer Park at 15,399 and Columbia Point at 14,933.

Average catch is 6.9, with a range from 10.7 at The Dalles to 1.5 at Umatilla.

Just under 210 tagged fish have been turned in.

Effort is 18,548 on the season.

The sport reward program pays anglers from $5 to $8 per pikeminnow, with tagged ones worth $500. The idea is to remove the native species that preys on young salmon and steelhead in the Columbia hydropower system.

For more details, including fishing maps, check out pikeminnow.org.

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