Category Archives: Headlines

2019 Halibut, Bottomfish Seasons Subject Of 4 ODFW Early Aug. Meetings

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

ODFW will host a series of public meetings the week of Aug. 6 to gather input on the 2019 recreational bottomfish and halibut seasons. People who can’t attend meetings can also listen in via Webcast (details below).

MORE YELLOWEYE ROCKFISH WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR HARVEST DURING OREGON’S 2019 SALTWATER FISHERIES. (ODFW)

One key change for next year is that beginning in 2019, the amount of yelloweye rockfish that all fisheries, including recreational fisheries, are allowed to impact will be going up. This increase in yelloweye rockfish should allow for some additional opportunities. However the quotas for many other bottomfish species will remain at current levels or decrease a bit. ODFW will be seeking input on how to balance the season structure and regulations to stay within these allocations.

“It’s important that we hear from a wide range of anglers before making decisions on the 2019 seasons,” said ODFW Recreational Halibut and Bottomfish Project Leader Lynn Mattes.

The meetings will be held:
Monday, Aug. 6, 6-8 p.m. in Salem at ODFW Headquarters (4034 Industrial Drive SE) in the Commission Room.
Tuesday, Aug. 7, 6-8 p.m. in Newport at the Marine Resources Program office, 2040 SE Marine Science Drive.  This meeting will also be webcast, details below.
Wednesday, Aug. 8, 6-8 p.m. in Brookings at the Southwestern Oregon Community College, Curry Campus, 96082 Lone Ranch Parkway.
Thursday, Aug.9, 6-8 p.m. in North Bend at the Public Library, 1800 Sherman Street.

Anglers who wish to provide input but cannot attend a meeting in person or via the webcast can contact Lynn Mattes at 541-867-4741 ext. 237 or lynn.mattes@state.or.us or Christian Heath at 541-867-4741 ext. 266 or Christian.t.heath@state.or.us.  Background information will be posted on the ODFW sport bottomfish and sport halibut webpages by Aug. 3.

Webcast details:
Join from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/173547725
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (571) 317-3122
Access Code: 173-547-725
First GoToMeeting? Do a quick system check: https://link.gotomeeting.com/system-check

ODFW OKs Second Rods For Coos Bay, Rogue; ‘Exceptional Return’ Of Kings Expected On Latter

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Anglers with the two-rod validation will be able to use two rods in Coos Bay and the Rogue River beginning on Aug. 1, under a temporary rule adopted by ODFW this month.

TWO PRIME OREGON SOUTH COAST WATERS WILL OPEN FOR ANGLERS TO USE SECOND RODS WITH THE ODFW ENDORSEMENT. FISHERY MANAGERS EXPECT AN “EXCEPTIONAL RETURN” OF KINGS ON ONE, THE ROGUE, WHILE COOS BAY CHINOOK CAN PRODUCE WELL TOO. JORGE RUBIO SNAPPED THIS SHOT OF ONE ON THE LATTER IN 2013. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Effective Aug. 1 to Sept. 30, Coos Bay anglers who have a 2018 two-rod validation will be able to use two rods while fishing for Chinook salmon or hatchery coho salmon where fishing is open to salmon in Coos Bay (Coos Bay, Coos River, South Fork Coos River from mouth to the head of tide at Dellwood, Millicoma River).

Rogue River anglers with a two-rod validation will be able to use two rods from Aug. 1 to Sept. 3 (please note different closing date) while fishing for Chinook salmon or hatchery Coho salmon where fishing is open to salmon in the Rogue River from the mouth upstream to Ferry Hole Boat Ramp (RM 5) near Gold Beach.

In both areas, only one rod may be used when fishing for species other than salmon.

“Many Coos Bay salmon anglers have been asking for the option of using two rods,” said Gary Vonderohe, ODFW fish biologist in Charleston.

According to Laura Green, ODFW fish biologist in Gold Beach, this will be a good year for two-rod fishing on the Rogue.

“We’re expecting an exceptional return of Chinook salmon to the Rogue this fall,” she said.

Two-rod validations cost $24.50 for both residents and non-residents. Licensed anglers who purchase the validation can use two rods wherever regulations allow them, which is primarily in ponds and lakes. When possible, ODFW extends the validations to specific streams. Kids under the age of 12 do not need a validation to use a second rod.

For the latest fishing regulations, see the Fishing Report in ODFW’s Recreation Report at www.MyODFW.com

Far Upper Roosevelt To Open For Sturgeon Aug. 1; Retention Closing Lakewide Sept. 1

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE BY THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Action: Opens an additional section of Lake Roosevelt for the harvest of white sturgeon.

SCOTT HENSLEY SHOWS OFF A LAKE ROOSEVELT STURGEON CAUGHT EARLIER THIS SEASON. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Sets closing date for section of Lake Roosevelt from Grand Coulee Dam to China Bend boat launch, which opened June 15.

Species affected: White sturgeon.

Locations and effective dates:

Lake Roosevelt, from China Bend Boat Ramp upstream to the Canadian Border. Open Aug. 1 through Aug. 31, 2018.

Lake Roosevelt, from Grand Coulee Dam to China Bend Boat Ramp (including the Spokane River from Highway 25 Bridge upstream to 400’ below Little Falls Dam, Colville River upstream to Meyers Falls and the Kettle River upstream to Barstow Bridge) remains open seven days per week through Aug. 31, 2018.

Reason for action: The portion of Lake Roosevelt between China Bend and the Canadian border is managed as a spawning sanctuary for white sturgeon. Sturgeon spawning is completed by Aug. 1, so a one-month harvest fishery will be opened in this area.

Fishery managers have set a closing date of Aug. 31, when they estimate the target harvest of 1,000 fish will be reached.

Additional information: Daily limit 1 sturgeon. Annual limit 2 sturgeon. It is legal to retain sturgeon between 53 inches and 63 inches fork length. Fork length is measured from the tip of the snout to middle of the fork in the caudal fin (tail). All harvested sturgeon must be recorded on a Catch Record Card (Catch Code 549). Two-pole fishing is allowed. Closed to night fishing. All other statewide rules for white sturgeon must be observed.

Anglers are asked to use heavy gear (50-pound test mainline and leader, at a minimum) and use 14/0 hooks or smaller (approximately 2 inches or less from point to shank) to avoid catching or injuring large, wild adult sturgeon. The request to use heavier gear will ensure anglers hook and land sturgeon effectively, while also protecting large, wild adult brood sturgeon that – if hooked – should be played to hand quickly and released without being removed from the water. WDFW recommends that any fish that will not be legally retained should not be removed from the water prior to release.

The 2018 harvest target for Lake Roosevelt is 1,000 fish. The slot limit and other fishery rules will be strictly enforced. Anglers should note that the Lake Roosevelt sturgeon fishery (Grand Coulee Dam to the Canadian border) will be closed beginning Sept. 1, 2018.

Lake Roosevelt fisheries are co-managed between WDFW, Spokane Tribe of Indians and Colville Confederated Tribes. Non-tribal anglers are asked to be respectful of tribal angling and both tribal and non-tribal sturgeon research that is occurring on the reservoir.

Anglers are reminded that fishery dates, times, slot limits, daily limits and annual limits may be adjusted over time to ensure a sustainable population of sturgeon is maintained in Lake Roosevelt and that equitable access to the fishery amongst the three co-managers is achieved.

In 2017, a harvest sturgeon fishery opened in Lake Roosevelt for the first time in more than 20 years. Fishery managers in Washington state and British Columbia began sturgeon hatchery programs in the early 2000s in response to a decades-long decline in the white sturgeon population in Lake Roosevelt. Survival rates for those hatchery-produced juvenile sturgeon were much higher than was anticipated, allowing fishery managers to open the lake for the harvest of white sturgeon.

Baker Sockeye Anglers Renew Call To Manage Fishery With Runsize Buffer

With a lower than expected salmon run leaving them again feeling shorted, some anglers are renewing calls for a Columbia River springer-style fisheries buffer on sockeye headed to a North Cascades reservoir.

Baker Lake reds were supposed to provide sport and tribal fishermen 12,400 fish each, but while members of the latter fleet were able to harvest 12,176, the former’s haul could ultimately come in around just 56 percent of the quota.

FRANK URABECK AND GRANDSON ALEC SCHANTZ SHOW OFF FIVE SOCKEYE FROM BAKER LAKE. URABECK REPORTS THIS YEAR’S FISH ARE TOUGH FIGHTERS. (FRANK URABECK)

Frank Urabeck, a longtime advocate of recreational fisheries, estimates that when it’s all said and done, it’s “likely” that Skagit River plunkers and Baker Lake trollers will have put somewhere in the neighborhood of 7,000 sockeye on their barbecues, 5,400 fewer than the preseason agreement allowed, and nearly 5,200 fewer than Swinomish and Sauk-Suiattle fishermen took.

It’s also in part due to our less efficient methods and that it gets tougher to catch the fish as they near spawning, but the harvest disparity “could have been avoided had (the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife) adopted in-season harvest management improvement proposals put forth by CCA and others,” a press release from Urabeck states.

This year’s seasons were set on the expectation 35,002 sockeye would come back, but after tribal fishermen hit Skagit Bay and the lower river it begin to become apparent that fewer of the salmon were actually returning, somewhere around 30,000. Over 14,450 have been tallied at the Baker River fish trap and nearly 6,850 have been transported up to the lake.

It’s led Puget Sound Anglers President Ron Garner to renew the call to use something like the 30-percent set aside on the Columbia in case the ESA-listed spring Chinook run doesn’t come in as predicted.

That effectively reduces how many kings are available in the early portion of the season until managers are comfortable that preseason predictions will be met, or exceeded, and can reopen angling if enough fish are available.

“Under today’s complex salmon fisheries layout there are many problems in dividing fish as each area presents its own set of problems of how to secure equity,” said Garner in a press release. “Baker Lake sockeye is one fishery where we have the ability to do that using the Puget Sound Energy Baker River fish trap at Concrete, where Skagit Basin tribes can secure make-up sockeye, if needed, beyond what is achieved from net fishing.”

He says in years when the run comes in low, inequities can be avoided or minimized using the buffer.

Last fall, when the sockeye issue came before the state Fish and Wildlife Commission, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife staffers appeared hesitant to institute a buffer because of perceived tribal pushback over the potential for not being able to harvest their share. They wanted to try improved forecasting and opening more of the Skagit to fishing to achieve a closer balance.

“Unfortunately, while advocated by sport fishing groups, the department chose not to pursue a buffer, resulting in a significant disparity again. A buffer has to be part of harvest management next year,” Garner said.

Others expressing frustration over the issue include Al Senyohl of the Steelhead Trout Club of Washington, Nello Picinich of Coastal Conservation Association of Washington, and Roger Goodan of CCA Washington’s North Sound Chapter.

Urabeck says that this year’s imbalance means the tribes will have caught 24,000 more sockeye than sports since 2013.

But WDFW appears to be taking the long view. While Urabeck calls the 2010 and ’11 seasons “outliers,” state managers point out that between 2010 and 2017, the score was actually pretty close, 98,390 treaty fishermen, 94,737 recreational anglers.

And they say it’s likely to even out over time and even sway in our way if we see more big years like 2012, ’13 and ’14.

As for dipping into the fish trap, that’s likely a nonstarter with tribal fishermen. I hear over and over they want to fish the way they want to fish, and that means with a net, not lining up for a salmon handout.

Ultimately it’s in everybody’s best interest to get the forecast right the first time, though that is easier said than done.

Hot Weather Fishing Tips From ODFW

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

As temperatures rise, fish (especially coldwater species like trout) feel the heat, too.

AN ANGLER TRIES THEIR LUCK AT THE ROARING RIVER WILDERNESS’S SHELLROCK LAKE. (ODFW)

Anglers can do their part to reduce the stress fish are under. This is especially important when fishing in waters that include native fish that may be released.

Follow these tips to help fish:

  • Fish early in the day when water temperatures are cooler.
  • Look for trout in deep, high elevation lakes or shaded streams near headwaters. These places are often cooler. More about high lakes fishing
  • Use appropriate gear and land fish quickly. The longer the fight, the less likely the fish will survive.
  • Keep the fish in the water when you unhook it and cradle the fish upright until it revives enough to swim away.
  • Use your judgement. If conditions where you want to fish seem especially severe (low, hot water), consider fishing somewhere else where water conditions are better.

Area 11 To Reopen For Salmon Fishing From Boats 7 Days A Week

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Action: Marine Area 11 (Tacoma-Vashon Island) will reopen to boat angling for salmon seven days per week.

AREA 11 WILL REOPEN FOR SEVEN-DAY-A-WEEK SALMON FISHING STARTING TUESDAY, JULY 31. BRIAN JOHNSON CAUGHT THIS BEEFY ONE OFF TACOMA’S POINT DEFIANCE A COUPLE SEASONS BACK. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Salmon fishing is also open daily in Marine Area 11 from fishing piers and shorelines.

Effective date: 12 a.m. Tuesday, July 31.

Species affected: Salmon.

Location: Marine Area 11 (Tacoma-Vashon Island).

Reason for action: The fishery was closed to boat anglers Tuesdays through Thursdays to allow the fishery to extend later into the season. Sufficient quota is available to reopen Marine Area 11 to salmon fishing from a boat 7 days per week.

Additional information: For specific regulations, anglers should consult the 2018-19 Washington Sports Fishing Rules pamphlet available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/.

Anglers can check WDFW’s website at https: //wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html for the latest information on marine areas that are managed to a quota or guideline.

Information contact: David Stormer, (360) 902-0058; or Mark Baltzell, Puget Sound salmon manager, (360) 902-2807

Ocean Biologists Excited By Early Arrival Of Coldwater Copepods Off NW Coast

“Friendly faces” turned up earlier this year than last and for only the second time in the past four years off the Northwest coast, a “dramatic shift” that might be good news for salmon and other fish stocks.

FEDERAL BIOLOGISTS CALL IT “A WELCOME ARRIVAL,” THE RETURN OF COLDWATER COPEPODS TO THE NORTHWEST OCEAN. (NWFSC)

Federal biologists say offshore samples they’ve been collecting in recent months have been “full” of three different species of coldwater copepods, and they report “healthy” numbers of adult krill are also being seen.

“These are all good indications that the zooplankton community is transitioning back to a more ‘normal’ state,” writes Samantha Zeman on the Northwest Fisheries Science Center’s always interesting Newportal blog.

It’s been all out of whack since The Blob began to affect the northeast Pacific beginning in 2013, with the “hangover” from the humongous pool of too-warm saltwater continuing into last year.

“These coldwater copepods are lipid-rich and represent a productive food chain for higher trophic levels,” explains Zeman.

Their arrival also marks a “biological spring transition” that is key for coho and Chinook, with the earlier they’re seen translating to higher survival for silver salmon.

“This is especially exciting because in recent years (2015 and 2016) we never saw the copepod community transition from a warm winter community to a cold summer upwelling community, and in 2017 the transition occurred very late in the season,” Zeman writes.

An NWFSC chart showing transition dates since 1970 simply says “Never” for both 2015 and 2016.

In the former year, the annual June survey of juvenile salmon at sea was marked by emaciated coho.

A SIDE-BY-SIDE COMPARISON OF JUVENILE COHO MADE IN 2015 BY THE NORTHWEST FISHERIES SCIENCE CENTER SHOWS A HEALTHY ONE AT TOP AND A SAD-EYED ONE IN POOR CONDITION AT BOTTOM. (NWIFC)

Sampling also began turning up pyrosomes, a tubular organism that feeds on plankton and is generally found in more tropical waters, but the numbers of which exploded last year, fouling fishing gear from Oregon all the way to Alaska. A new study suggests they may be adapting to our cooler ocean and could become a permanent part of the biome.

PYROSOMES CLING TO A WESTPORT ANGLER’S DOWNRIGGER BALL DURING 2017’S SALMON SEASON. (SALTPATROL.COM)

NWFSC’s chart also shows that coldwater copepods have otherwise been present for as long as 263 days in 2007 and 252 in 2009 to as few as 29 in 1983 and 57 in 2005.

The spring transition has begun as early as March 4 in 2008 and around the first day of spring in 1970, ’71, 2007 and ’09, to as late as July 21 in 1983 and June 28 in 2017.

Meanwhile, we’re waiting to learn more about results from this June’s juvenile salmon sampling.

Last year’s turned up some of the lowest numbers of juvenile Chinook and coho seen in the past two decades, which federal biologists could translate into “lean times” this year and next for some rivers’ stocks, including the Columbia.

But with the earlier arrival of copepods, hopefully this year’s fish are faring better.

Low Flows, High Temps Lead To 2015-style Closure Around, Up Umpqua Tribs

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Effective immediately, an emergency regulation protects wild summer steelhead and early returning fall chinook on the mainstem Umpqua River.

THE EMERGENCY REGULATION IS IN EFFECT FROM THE SCOTTSBURG BRIDGE UPSTREAM TO THE RIVER FORKS BOAT RAMP WHERE THE NORTH AND SOUTH UMPQUA JOIN. (ODOT)

Emergency regulation, Scottsburg Bridge (Hwy. 38) to River Forks Boat Ramp:

Today through September 30, 2018, angling is prohibited within a 200 feet radius of all tributaries in the Umpqua River and in the tributaries themselves from the mouth to 200 feet upstream. This regulation is in effect from Scottsburg Bridge to River Forks Boat Ramp.

This emergency regulation protects wild summer steelhead and fall Chinook salmon that hold in and around tributaries looking for colder water. Currently, the Umpqua River has abnormally low flows and high water temperatures due to drought conditions.

“The Umpqua River at Elkton was 79 degrees this morning, and we know that temperature will be higher in the late afternoons. We believe the closure is needed to help protect our native fish that use these areas of cooler water,” said Greg Huchko, Umpqua District fisheries biologist. “Salmon and steelhead begin to have a tough time when water temperatures reach the upper 60’s, and we aren’t seeing a cooling trend any time in the near future.”

This emergency regulation was also in effect in late June 2015 and had public support.

Tips for hot weather angling:

  • Fish during the cooler early mornings.
  • Land your fish quickly to help increase survival rates.
  • Keep your fish in at least six inches of water while releasing it.
  • Revive the fish before release. Keep the fish upright facing into the current; if the current is slow, move the fish back and forth slowly to help oxygenate the gills.

 

Study Shows Importance Of Puget Sound Chinook Production To Starving Orcas

A new analysis is showing the importance of Puget Sound Chinook for the inland sea’s orcas.

Fall kings from the Nooksack to the Deschutes to the Elwha were ranked as the most important current feedstocks for the starving southern residents, followed by Lower Columbia and Strait of Georgia tribs.

A JOINT STATE-FEDERAL ANALYSIS IDENTIFIED THE SNOHOMISH RIVER BASIN AS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PRODUCERS OF CHINOOK FOR LOCAL ORCAS. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

For the analysis, NOAA and WDFW sampled orca doots to “assist in prioritizing actions to increase critical prey for the whales.”

Nutritional stress has been identified as among the chief causes of their declining numbers, and the news comes as officials report a newborn calf died off Victoria yesterday. Just half of the 28 reproductive-age “blackfish” have produced calves in the last 10 years, another report said.

“Ramp up the hatchery production. Do it now. It’s the only way,” says Tom Nelson, co-host of Seattle outdoors radio show The Outdoor Line on 710 ESPN.

He was reacting this morning while fishing for coho at Possession Bar to a Seattle Times scoop on the findings.

Reporter Lynda V. Mapes writes that from the standpoint of federal overseers, “In some instances, it might make more sense to focus on habitat restoration rather than increasing hatchery releases, [NOAA’s Lynn] Barre said. “It has to be evaluated on a watershed level … It’s not just ‘let’s make more fish to feed the whales,’ hold on, there are a few things to consider.’”

A MATRIX FROM THE NOAA-WDFW RANKS THE MOST IMPORTANT CHINOOK STOCKS FOR SOUTHERN RESIDENT KILLER WHALES BY BASIN.

Nelson, who has a degree in fisheries biology, acknowledges that the problems salmon and orcas face are highly complex, with few if any single-faceted answers, but with J, K and L pods down to just 75 animals, action is needed right now, and not just restricting already restricted salmon seasons.

“A significant increase in hatchery releases has to happen. Anything else is a long-term fix. The killer whales don’t have time,” Nelson says.

With nine out of every 10 adult Puget Sound Chinook born at, reared in and released from hatcheries, the state is planning on bolstering prroduction, with the Fish and Wildlife Commission making moves towards that, along with adding  protections for orcas from vessels, another key factor in their struggles. Pollutants also play a role.

Both the salmon stock and marine mammals are listed under the Endangered Species Act, which NOAA is charged with enforcing.

But to achieve a meaningful increase in wild Chinook numbers, you have to have better habitat, Nelson says, and that’s unlikely to occur any time soon in our densely populated region.

“If you think you’re going to get everyone to move out of the Central Sound and get it back to presettlement days, you’re dreaming,” Nelson says.

A lot of habitat work is occurring in estuaries, side channels and elsewhere, but results are painfully slow, and that pace could impact the region’s interest in continuing with the much-needed work.

Meanwhile, 89 percent of this year’s forecast of 255,219 fall kings expected to return to Strait of Juan de Fuca, Puget Sound and Hood Canal rivers are hatchery fish.

KIRAN WALGAMOTT PEERS INTO AN UNUSED RACEWAY AT THE WALLACE SALMON HATCHERY NEAR GOLD BAR. THE FACILITY REARS SUMMER KINGS. CHINOOK PRODUCTION IN WESTERN WASHINGTON IS HALF OF WHAT IT WAS IN 1989 AS HATCHERY PRACTICES HAVE BEEN REFORMED TO HELP WILD STOCKS RECOVER. (ANDY WALGAMOTT)

The importance of Puget Sound Chinook — both wild and adipose-fin-clipped hatchery ones — to SRKWs is otherwise obvious because of where they hang out, off the Washington Coast, in the Straits and in the San Juans, where those salmon stocks return through on the way to their home rivers.

Upper and Middle Columbia and Snake upriver brights, and Fraser, Lower Columbia trib and Fraser springers were also highly important stocks, the analysis found.

But they also fed to a degree on Chinook from as far away as the Sacramento and Southeast Alaska.

“We can use this information as a guide, based on the best science, to help inform decisions about how we spend recovery dollars for both salmon and Southern Resident killer whales,” said Chris Yates, Assistant Regional Administrator for Protected Resources in NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region, in a NOAA news story on the analysis. “We remain committed to recovery of all West Coast salmon stocks, and this helps us understand where we can maximize our resources and partnerships to help killer whales too.”

In the words of one close observer of the salmon world, the whales don’t care if kings have an extra fin or not, yet hatchery production has and probably will face more legal challenges.

With harbor seals and sea lions identified as eating large numbers of Puget Sound Chinook before they can mature into orca fodder, Nelson also called for reducing pinniped numbers, which he says could show results in as few as three years in terms of salmon prey availability for killer whales.

A HARBOR SEAL STEALS A SAN JUANS CHINOOK LITERALLY OFF AN ANGLER’S LINE. (HUGH ALLEN)

That and hatchery production would also yield more fish for anglers and help WDFW sell more licenses, easing its budget issues.

Area 9 Reopening For Hatchery Kings July 26-29

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICE FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Hatchery chinook retention to reopen in Marine Area 9

Action: Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) will reopen for four days to the retention of hatchery chinook salmon.

(ANDY WALGAMOTT)

Effective date: 12 a.m. Thursday, July 26, through 11:59 p.m. Sunday, July 29.

Species affected: Hatchery chinook salmon.

Location: Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet).

Reason for action: The fishery was closed to hatchery chinook retention July 23 through July 25 to allow fishery managers to evaluate the catch and determine available quota.

Through Sunday, July 22, anglers had caught 79 percent of the available hatchery chinook quota. Sufficient quota is available to reopen Marine Area 9 to the retention of hatchery chinook salmon for a limited duration.

After the fishery closes at the end of Sunday, July 29, fishery managers will again evaluate catch. Should there be sufficient quota available, WDFW will announce when the fishery will reopen to hatchery chinook retention.

Additional information: The initial closure of hatchery chinook salmon retention in Marine Area 9 will remain in effect through 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, July 25.

During this time, anglers must release both hatchery and wild chinook, chum, and wild coho, but may retain two salmon as part of the daily limit.

From July 26 through July 29, anglers fishing Marine Area 9 may keep one hatchery chinook as part of the daily limit of two salmon but must release chum, wild chinook, and wild coho.

Waters of Marine Area 9 south of a line from Foulweather Bluff to Olele point will remain closed to salmon fishing through August 15.

The Edmonds Fishing Pier is not subject to the closure for hatchery chinook retention. Regulations for the pier are as listed in the Washington Sports Fishing Rules pamphlet.

For specific regulations, anglers should consult the 2018-19 Washington Sports Fishing Rules pamphlet available online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/.

Anglers can check WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html for the latest information on marine areas that are managed to a quota or guideline.