All posts by Andy Walgamott

SW WA, Columbia Fishing Report (1-16-18)

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ORIGINATED WDFW AND WAS TRANSMITTED BY JOE HYMER, PSMFC

Salmon/Steelhead

Cowlitz River – From the I-5 Br. downstream:  5 bank rods had no catch.  Upstream from the I-5 Br:  19 bank and 1 boat rods had no catch.

WITH HER STEELHEAD RIVER RUNNING HIGH, PAULA CORCORAN WENT WITH A SPIN-N-GLO TAPED WITH HYPER-VIS AND FISHED CLOSE TO THE BANK, CATCHING THIS NICE WINTER-RUN. (YO-ZURI PHOTO CONTEST)

Early hatchery steelhead returns to date

Kind of a mixed bag from the same time last year.

River                      2018                       2017

Grays                    0                              30
Elochoman          581                         36
Kalama                 246                         190
Lewis                     251                         1,084
Washougal          193                         128

Note:  Cowlitz is late stock.

Elochoman River – From Shane McEneny, WDFW Fish Hatchery Specialist 4 – This year’s return is coming back from a plant of only 65k smolts but is the first year since before 2009 that the fish were reared with predator netting and fencing. Numbers of returning adults have been phenomenal as we are close to 600 trapped for the season with anticipations of reaching 1,000.  We are surplussing and recycling adults which we haven’t done for years and the fishing pressure has been enormous with a lot of happy fisherman.  Next winter’s return will come back from a plant of almost double the smolts.

Bonneville Dam to McNary Dam – No effort was observed for steelhead.

Sturgeon

Bonneville and The Dalles pools – Boat anglers are catching some legals.  The Dalles Pool was the best with a legal kept per about every 3 rods.

Bass and Walleye

Bonneville Pool – No effort was observed for either specie.

The Dalles Pool – Bank and boat anglers are doing well for walleye.  No effort was observed for bass.

Trout

Recent plants of catchable size to 10 pound rainbows and surplus adult winter steelhead released into SW WA waters.  No report on angling success.

Lake/Pond
Date
Species
Number
Fish perPound
Hatchery
Notes

* CARLISLE LK (LEWI)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=CARLISLE%20LK%20(LEWI)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>

Jan 08, 2018
Rainbow
100
0.2
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

* HORSESHOE LK (COWL)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=HORSESHOE%20LK%20(COWL)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>

Jan 09, 2018
Rainbow
115
0.2
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Jan 04, 2018
Rainbow
2,400
2.34
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

* ICE HOUSE LK (SKAM)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=ICE%20HOUSE%20LK%20(SKAM)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>

Jan 05, 2018
Rainbow
1,450
2.4
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

* KRESS LK (COWL)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=KRESS%20LK%20(COWL)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>

Jan 09, 2018
Steelhead
8
0.1
KALAMA FALLS HATCHERY
Adult Winters

Jan 08, 2018
Steelhead
44
0.1
KALAMA FALLS HATCHERY
Adult Winters

Jan 05, 2018
Steelhead
26
0.1
KALAMA FALLS HATCHERY
Adult Winters

Jan 04, 2018
Rainbow
2,000
2.34
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Jan 04, 2018
Steelhead
30
0.1
KALAMA FALLS HATCHERY
Adult Winters

Jan 03, 2018
Steelhead
22
0.1
KALAMA FALLS HATCHERY
Adult Winters

* LK SACAJAWEA (COWL)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=LK%20SACAJAWEA%20(COWL)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC

Jan 10, 2018
Rainbow
30
0.1
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Jan 10, 2018
Rainbow
66
0.2
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

* SPEARFISH LK (KLIC)<https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/search.php?searchby=LakeStocked&search=SPEARFISH%20LK%20(KLIC)&orderby=LakeStocked%20ASC,%20StockDate%20DESC>
Jan 03, 2018
Rainbow
2,080
2.08
GOLDENDALE HATCHERY

Fewer Smelt Than Last Year’s Small Run Expected

Columbia smelt managers are forecasting the fewest of the tasty, oily fish back since at least 2011.

They say the run will be “smaller in magnitude than the 2017 return,” which saw 1.6 million pounds worth of eulachon come into the big river and its lower tributaries to spawn.

SMELT DIPPERS AND OBSERVERS GATHER ALONG THE LOWER COWLITZ ON FEBRUARY 25, 2017, DURING A FIVE-HOUR OPENER THAT WAS DESCRIBED AS “PRETTY MUCH A BUST” WHEN FEW CAUGHT ANY. (OLAF LANGNESS, WDFW)

Following test-boat fisheries, that was enough to open one day’s worth of dipping on the Cowlitz in late February.

But that turned out to be “largely a bust.”

Managers estimate sport dippers harvested all of 540 pounds.

That’s down from 290,000-plus pounds in 2015.

Poor ocean conditions are blamed for recent years’ declining smelt runs, which peaked with 16.6 million pounds in 2014.

A GRAPH AND CHART SHOW COLUMBIA RIVER SMELT ABUNDANCE AND HARVESTS IN RECENT YEARS. (WDFW)

Columbia smelt are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

Following longterm declines, seasons were closed for three straight years, but with federal blessing, WDFW was able in 2014 to hold limited “research fisheries” to survey the population.

Changing Of The Guard At Wildlife Forever, National Conservation Nonprofit

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM WILDLIFE FOREVER

After 25 years of service to fish and wildlife conservation, Wildlife Forever’s President & CEO, Douglas Grann has announced his retirement and turned over the leadership reins to Pat Conzemius, Executive Vice President.

DOUGLAS GRANN (CENTER, NO ID BADGE) HAS RETIRED FROM WILDLIFE FOREVER, WHICH WILL NOW BE LED BY PAT CONZEMIUS (SECOND FROM LEFT). (WILDLIFE FOREVER)

Grann joined the non-profit organization in March of 1992. Prior to Wildlife Forever, he was Executive Vice President, Voyageur Art specializing in state duck-stamp prints and created the Australia “First of Nation” Duck Stamp Program.  He also served as Director of Operations for the National Wild Turkey Federation, starting their popular Super Fund Banquet program.

Mr. Grann’s responsibilities included the leadership of Wildlife Forever, management of staff and programs, plus creation and development of national campaigns. Grann states his greatest achievement was ensuring no less than 80% of every dollar raised was spent on conservation.  This goal was accomplished for 25 years with 94% of all revenue going directly to mission, confirmed by independent audits, in recent years.

“Wildlife Forever was built and supported by individuals who care deeply about the future of fish and wildlife.” said Mr. Grann.  “I am most thankful for those dedicated members, directors, staff and sponsors who invested in conservation and believed in developing stewardship in America’s youth. Thank you all, it has been a privilege to guide Wildlife Forever.”

Under his direction, numerous national initiatives have flourished.  He was instrumental in the creation of the State-Fish Art Contest (SFA); Master’s Walleye Circuit (MWC), World Walleye Championship (WWC); Handicapped Americans for Wildlife Conservation (HAWC); Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Alliance (TRCA); “Racing for Wildlife” (NASCAR); and the Clean Drain Dry (CD2) Initiative.

One of the best measures of success comes from credibility and what others say about one’s work. Over Grann’s 25-year span, Wildlife Forever has received 60 special recognitions and major awards from state and federal agencies, corporations and governmental organizations.

“It’s been an honor and a pleasure to work with Doug Grann,” said Scott Grieve, Chairman, Wildlife Forever.  “I have served on the Board during Doug’s building of the organization and developing programs.  His tireless work on behalf of conservation and education is admired by everyone who knows him. We look forward to his continued leadership and new role as President of the Board.”

Grieve further said, “Wildlife Forever believes conservation education will ultimately determine the future of America’s fish & wildlife heritage. It is only through education and participation that we will pass on the stewardship of our natural resources to the next generation.”

As Wildlife Forever moves forward this vision remains the same for Pat Conzemius.  Pat has served for the past 10 years as Conservation Director and has handled all conservation projects, partnerships, grants and campaigns.  Conzemius concluded, “I am proud to continue this legacy Doug has built and will do all I can to ensure we maintain the highest of standards and always work to conserve America’s fish and wildlife.”

Tannerite Addresses Factory-destroying Fire Rumors In Press Release

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM TANNERITE

As most of our wonderful supporters and customers now know our company has suffered a devastating fire at our factory which resulted in a total loss on early Monday morning, 01/08/18.

We would like to thank the Pleasant Hill fire, Goshen fire, Springfield fire, South Lane fire, Lowell fire, Dexter fire, McKenzie fire, Mohawk fire and Coburg fire personnel that did a stellar job at saving what they could save. We are happy that none of them were injured in responding to this large fire, and that no one else was injured.

Needless to say with this fire now just a little over forty-eight hours old, we are still in initial recovery mode, still getting questions answered, and very much working hard to get initial solutions in place.

We would like to clear up some misinformation that was reported in the media and on social media. One, we have no evidence at this time that this was arson or insurance fraud. Two, there was no explosion as there were no explosives on the premises. While there were some 1.4g special effects fireworks from another company, that have no special storage requirements, waiting to be shipped out that were set off by the fire; these had nothing to do with target making components. Last, that company was not operating illegally.

I personally responded to all media inquiries, leaving messages with five sources after they contacted the office with only two returning my calls. I diligently worked with the fire investigators in order to efficiently work through the local and State investigators and we are told those should finish up tomorrow; once we get their reports we will know more. 

Everyone at the company appreciates all the support and patience we have received as we work towards getting resources in place to execute a business recovery plan. We are working to have a solid plan in place for recovery very soon and when we do, we will communicate that to the public and our business partners.

The Tannerite Sports family would like to thank everyone for their support.

On Behalf of Tannerite Sports L.L.C.,

Sincerely,
Steve Yerger
Corporate Investigator

WDFW Posts Puget Sound Chinook Presentation For Today’s Commission Meeting

Ahead of this afternoon’s Fish and Wildlife Commission briefing, WDFW staffers have posted their presentation on the controversial proposed Puget Sound Chinook Harvest Management Plan.

The 52-page PDF is here and outlines the background on the salmon stock’s 1999 Endangered Species Act listing, its further declines, the reasoning behind the federal-court-mediated update of the previous plan, impacts the plan could potentially have on sport and tribal fisheries, and what’s next.

AN IMAGE FROM TODAY’S WDFW PRESENTATION TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMISSION. )WDFW)

Just as retired WDFW biologists and others have focused their attention, the presentation takes a deep dive on Stillaguamish Chinook — the river system has two runs, summers and falls — because as the document notes, it’s “likely to be one of the most constraining stocks.”

For the state and Stillaguamish Tribe, “extirpation of this population is not an option.”

The presentation puts forth several scenarios about how different Stilly forecasts could impact fisheries under the proposed plan, acknowleding sharp reductions to sport and tribal commercial and ceremonial fisheries under low returns to them possibly not being needed to meet goals with higher abundances.

Tying in the plight of southern resident orcas, the presentation says that the National Marine Fisheries Service has updated its maximum impact rates for several key Chinook stocks, lowering them.

And it says that NMFS has concerns with the plan as is and whether it “represents an acceptable level of risk for Puget Sound Chinook.”

The presentation states:

“Additional constraints on fisheries are likely needed in the new plan given decline in abundances and lower RER [rebuilding explooitation rate] values. This is a hard message to accept given that majority of Puget Sound recreational fisheries are mark -selective for Chinook, and that many of the impacts on Puget Sound stocks occur in fisheries north of Washington.”

But it also says that accepting higher levels of risk should come with mitigation strategies — “an approach used in prior plans where harvest rates were higher than NOAA was comfortable with as a starting point” — and points to possible additional measures such as increased hatchery production, marking fish different and habitat work.

More details after today’s conference.

Area 10 Blackmouth Limit Upped To 2; Areas 8-9 Reopening Feb. 16

THE FOLLOWING ARE EMERGENCY RULE-CHANGE NOTICES FROM THE WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Anglers can keep 2 hatchery chinook salmon in Marine Area 10 beginning Jan. 13

Action: The daily limit for hatchery chinook salmon will increase to two fish in Marine Area 10 (Seattle/Bremerton).

Effective Date: Jan.13, 2018 through Feb. 28, 2018.

AREA 10, WHERE CLAY SCHURMAN CAUGH THIS BLACKMOUTH, WILL HAVE A LIMIT OF TWO HATCHERY KINGS A DAY STARTING JAN. 13. (FISHING PHOTO CONTEST)

Species affected: Salmon.

Location:  Marine Area 10 within Puget Sound, excluding year-round piers.

Reason for action: Anglers were previously limited to one hatchery chinook as part of a two-salmon daily limit to ensure the fishery would remain open for the entire season. Preliminary estimates and fishery projections indicate that sufficient fish remain in the quota for the fishery to remain open through the scheduled season with the increased limit for hatchery chinook.

Other information: WDFW biologists will continue to monitor these fisheries and coordinate with the Puget Sound Sportfishing Advisory Group to determine any further action is necessary. Marine Areas 8-1, 8-2 and 9 remain closed untilFebruary 16, 2018.

The daily salmon limit is two fish. Anglers must release wild chinook and wild coho. Year-round piers are unaffected by this rule change and have a daily limit for salmon of 2 fish, of which 1 may be a chinook..

………………………………………

Action: Marine areas 8-1, 8-2 and 9 will re-open to salmon fishing.

Effective Date: Feb. 16, 2018.

Species affected: Salmon

Location: Marine areas 8-1 (Deception Pass, Hope Island and Skagit Bay), 8-2 (Port Susan and Port Gamble), and 9 (Admiralty Inlet) within Puget Sound.

Reason for action: Test fishing data indicates there are still numerous juvenile (sublegal-sized) chinook salmon present in these marine areas, although they are approaching legal size. WDFW temporarily closed these areas (November 13through February 15) until more legal chinook become available to harvest.

Other information: WDFW biologists will continue to monitor these fisheries and coordinate with the Puget Sound Sportfishing Advisory Group if any further action is necessary. 

The daily salmon limit will be one salmon, release coho and wild chinook.

Edmonds Public Fishing Pier is unaffected by this rule change and specific regulations can be found in the Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet.

WDFW Fish Reg Simplification Proposals Head To Commission For Final Vote

Due to strong angler pushback, Washington fishing managers will recommend against allowing chumming statewide and eliminating special panfish rules, but say other simplifications they’re supporting will help shrink the gamefish section of the regulations pamphlet by between a quarter and a third.

They’ll take the complete package to the Fish and Wildlife Commission next Friday for a final vote, then begin work on the next project: streamlining the saltwater and salmon fishing rules.

Among the freshwater proposals that WDFW managers Steve Thiesfeld, Chad Jackson and Chris Donley will ask the citizen panel to accept as is:

  • Eliminating minimum length and daily limit on eastern brook trout;
  • Eliminate mandatory steelhead retention
  • Consistent language for game fish possession limit
  • Removing duplicative landowner rules
  • Separate trout and steelhead rules
  • Standardize juvenile only waters
  • Steelhead incidental retention
  • Stream season for game fish (Saturday before Memorial Day through October 31)
  • Whitefish only season standardization

They’ll ask the commission to modify eight proposals having to do with applying standard statewide rules on still and moving waters.

For instance, requiring wild rainbows and cutthroat to be released in native steelhead gene banks such as the Nisqually, East Fork Lewis and other rivers.

But they’re scrapping statewide chumming, special panfish regs and a trout bait-fishing rule in favor of retaining the status quo.

“We didn’t recommend adoption because online public comment and public testimony at last month’s Commission meeting were overwhelmingly opposed to adoption of these rules,” says Donley, who is the far Eastern Washington fishing manager. “In a nutshell, we actually do listen to the public.”

As the agency gathered online comment on proposals, an overwhelming 247 out of 272 people were opposed to the panfish rule, with many saying that reservoirs such as Banks, Potholes and Moses should be excluded because species like crappie and bluegill would be wiped out and other fish species would also lose out on dinner.

At least 59 people were against allowing statewide chumming, while only 31 were for. “This is a bad idea and will lead to unnecessary overfishing and collateral damage to other species,” one cogent argument went, according to WDFW.

And 46 out of 69 were against doing away with the requirement that trout caught with bait but released be counted towards the daily limit of five.

But there was stronger, though not unanimous, support for other simplifications, and those will mostly move forward or be slightly tweaked.

“Adopting the proposed changes would reduce overall gamefish rules by approximately 30 percent,” says Donley. “This is a substantial reduction in the number of special rules that are required to be listed in the pamphlet but it is important  to keep in mind that marine and salmon rules haven’t been simplified yet,  but we are working on it.”

NMFS Highlights How White R. Levee Fix Helps Homeowners, Salmon, Habitat

THE FOLLOWING IS A NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE STORY

Puget Sound salmon got a boost this summer from a redesigned levee in Pacific, WA. While local leaders were determined to reduce frequent flooding of neighborhoods and businesses, NOAA and partners provided expertise in habitat restoration, as well as a portion of the funding. The results? King County improved resilience to flooding along the unpredictable river, and restored much-needed salmon habitat in the process.

AN ENGINEERED LOGJAM, PART OF A “BIO-REVETMENT” LEVEE ALONG THE WHITE RIVER IN PACIFIC, IN SOUTHWEST KING COUNTY. (NMFS)

The White River Chinook are among the local fish listed as Threatened. Decades of degraded habitat and overfishing have diminished wild salmon numbers. Since salmon need specific conditions for successful reproduction, habitat restoration is a critical priority. More off-channel habitat means the young fish are bigger and stronger when they head out to sea, thus more likely to make it home to their river for spawning.

The old White River levee, built in 1914, ran along the narrow channel of the river, cutting off the floodplain. With today’s knowledge of nature-based infrastructure, project engineers are able to reduce flooding and benefit salmon. Young fish gained an additional 121 acres off-channel habitat, more than a mile of natural shoreline, and thousands of sheltered places to eat, rest and grow. Eighteen acres replanted with native flora reinforces a protective riparian border.

NOAA Fisheries is committed to conserving and protecting listed species like the Chinook. This is one of multiple projects funded under the Commencement Bay Natural Resources Damage Assessment settlement that resulted from NOAA’s joint effort cleaning up after a nearby hazardous waste release.

“NOAA and partners provided $4.8 million dollars toward protecting the community,” said NOAA technical monitor Jason Lehto. “But salmon and other wildlife get substantial benefit, too.”

THE WHITE RIVER OVERTOPS AN OLD LEVEE FOLLOWING AN OCTOBER 2017 AND SURGING INTO A RESTORED FLOODPLAIN THAT HAD BEEN DRY FOR A CENTURY. (NMFS)

In October, a sudden storm pushed the river up and over the old levee, which breached as planned. The excess water spread over reconnected lowlands without flooding any nearby property. With more unpredictable sea levels and weather ahead, communities are turning to nature -based infrastructure solutions to find solutions like the White River/Countyline levee. The neighborhood is safer, and the White River Chinook have one more edge against extinction.

Pendleton 18-year-old Arrested For Allegedly Poaching Multiple Deer, Elk

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM THE OREGON STATE POLICE’S FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION

After a lengthy investigation involving Troopers of the Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish & Wildlife Division in Pendleton, a Pendleton area man was arrested on January 6, 2018 for multiple misdemeanor charges related to the illegal taking of wildlife on private and public lands within Umatilla County.

(OSP)

In September of 2017 an OSP Fish & Wildlife Trooper received information about alleged illegal hunting activities. As the investigation progressed, the primary suspect was identified as JOSEPH REIDE ST. PIERRE, age 18, from Pendleton, who was alleged to be illegally Hunting, Taking, and Wasting Wildlife on both Public and Private Properties in Umatilla County.

Information obtained during the investigation alleged that JOSEPH REIDE ST. PIERRE was involved in the Unlawful Taking of Wildlife as far back as the fall of 2016, to include a large mule deer buck, 3 large whitetail bucks, and two antlerless elk.

On Saturday January 6th, 2018 JOSEPH REIDE ST. PIERRE was lodged at the Umatilla County jail for probable cause and arraigned on Monday January 8, 2018 for the following charges;
* Unlawful Take of Buck Deer Closed Season-4 counts
* Unlawful Waste of Game animal-2 counts
* Hunting on the Cultivated Lands of Another- 3 counts
* Unlawful Discharge of a Firearm Across a Public Way -2counts
* Hunting prohibited method: Shotgun with shot restrictions — 1 count
* Unlawful Take of Antlerless Elk — 2 counts
* Exceeding Annual Bag Limit Elk- 1 Count
* Criminal Trespass In The Second Degree-1 counts
* Criminal Trespass While in Possession of a Firearm-1 count
* Unlawful Discharge of a Firearm from a Motor Vehicle-1 count
* Hunting with the Assistance of Artificial light- 1-count
* Assisting of Aiding another in committing wildlife violation, Unlawful Taking of Buck Deer-2 counts

Anyone with information related to this investigation is asked to call the Turn-in-Poacher TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or contact Trooper Tom Juzeler or Senior Trooper Ryan Sharp at the Pendleton office of the Oregon State Police 541-278-4090.

Kokanee Tank, Expert Angler Demos Coming To 3 Sportsmen’s Shows

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE FROM MACK’S LURE

Mack’s Lure, Inc., manufacturer of the famous Wedding Ring, Smile Blade, Sling Blade, Glo Hooks and more, is proud to be the presenting sponsor of the Bi-Mart Kokanee Tank at The 2018 Sportsmen’s Shows presented by The O’Loughlins. This year’s shows will take place in Puyallup, Wash. (Jan. 24-28), Portland, Ore. (Feb. 7-11) and Redmond, Ore. (Mar. 1-4).

IT’LL BE OUT WITH THE SPINYRAYS AND IN WITH THE KOKANEE WHEN A NEW FISH TANK DEMONSTRATION DEBUTS AT UPCOMING SPORTSMEN’S SHOWS IN PUYALLUP, PORTLAND AND REDMOND, OREGON. (MACK’S LURE)

The 40-foot tank, which will be used for demonstrations throughout each show, will be stocked with live kokanee for the first time. Several Mack’s Lure Pro and Guide Staff members will be on hand at the Washington Sportsman’s Show (Washington State Fair Events Center, Puyallup), Pacific Northwest Sportsman’s Show (Expo Center, Portland) and the Central Oregon Sportsman’s Show (Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Redmond) to provide seminars on kokanee fishing techniques, trolling tactics, lure and attractor combinations, and much more.

Headlining the seminars will be Mack’s Lure’s Gary Miralles, Jeff Witkowski, Ray Bailey and Mike Hall, each of whom are one of the region’s foremost experts in all things kokanee fishing. Together, the four anglers bring with them over 200 combined years of kokanee fishing experience. Some of the topics discussed will be trolling and jigging techniques, locating kokanee, rigging tips, seasonal approaches and more, which will accompany question and answer sessions.

Please see the seminar schedule below for the upcoming Washington Sportsman’s Show held at the Washington State Fair Events Center in Puyallup, Wash. from Wednesday, January 24 through Sunday, January 28. Seminar schedules for the Pacific Northwest Sportsman’s Show and the Central Oregon Sportsman’s Show will be announced at a later date.

Washington Sportsman’s Show (Puyallup) Seminar Schedule

Wed., Jan. 24 Thurs., Jan. 25 Fri. Jan. 26 Sat., Jan. 27 Sun., Jan. 28
1 p.m. – Bailey 1 p.m. – Witkowski 1 p.m. – Hall 11 a.m. – Hall 12 p.m. – Witkowski
2 p.m. – Hall 2 p.m. – Bailey 2 p.m. – Witkowski 1 p.m. – Bailey 1 p.m. – Hall
3 p.m. – Witkowski 3 p.m. – Hall 4 p.m. – Bailey 2 p.m. – Witkowski 2 p.m. – Bailey
4 p.m. – Bailey 5 p.m. – Witkowski 5 p.m. – Hall 3 p.m. – Hall
6 p.m. – Hall 6 p.m. – Bailey 6 p.m. – Witkowski 5 p.m. – Bailey
6 p.m. – Witkowski